This Week in Knitting: Nov 8

The weather is finally (finally!) turning in NorCal and even though we’re having a warm weekend (upper 70s), Fall is definitely in the air.  The leaves are turning, the evenings are longer and the nights are cold.  This is translating to more tea and even more knitting.

I’ve recently finished a couple of hats.

pairofhats

The first is Ysolda‘s first pattern from her Knitworthy collection, Bronntanas.   I used the super soft, super squishy Anzula Cricket (80% merino, 10% nylon, 10% cashmere).  The pattern was simple but interesting, and allowed me to refresh my “cabling without a cable needle” skills so I felt quite clever with this project.  I’m pleased with how it turned out.

Bronntanas

The second is Eppleby from Rachel Coopey’s recent book Toasty.  I used the recommended yarn, baa ram ewe’s Titus (50% wensleydale longwool, 20% bluefaced leicester, 30% UK alpaca) in the recommended color Chevin.

Eppleby

Titus is a fingering weight yarn, and the pattern is knit with small needles (3.0mm), so it took a long time (for a hat).  Here’s the bugger: I didn’t love Titus.  (?!!)  Based on the reviews, recommendations and hoards of positive popular press it has received, I thought I would be crazy for this yarn.  The problem for me is that it’s rather splitty.  Coopey’s pattern is an excellent one, but the yarn doesn’t do it justice.  The  twisted stitches don’t pop as much as they should, and you almost lose a little bit of the pattern after blocking as the yarn’s halo really appears.  The jury is still out for me re: Titus, I would like to try it in a looser gauge with a pattern that’s not all about texture.  I think I would like to try Eppleby again too, but with a yarn with great stitch definition.

As for what’s currently on my needles, I’m working on Shannon Cook’s Onward from her book Journey (co-authored with Jane Richmond).  This is a KAL with my sister and we are both excited not only to be knitting this project, but also to soon be wearing this project.

OnwardWIP

Perhaps the best part about this project is the yarn we’re using, YOTH Yarn’s Big Sister (80% merino, 10% nylon, 10% cashmere).  It’s very similar to Anzula Cricket but I think I prefer Big Sister for its twist, as it seems to be slightly better spun than Cricket.  My sister and I picked up this OOAK colorway when we were at Tolt Yarn and Wool this summer.  The color is masterfully dyed, it is the most perfect shade of silver grey I’ve ever laid eyes on.

YOTH

This week on Ravelry has seen some lovely new patterns.  Hilary Callis Smith‘s Adama is definitely queue-worthy, as are all the yoked sweaters from Kate Davies‘ new book Yokes (forthcoming).  I didn’t participate in Stephen West‘s Mystery Shawl KAL, but it’s been fun watching the WIP photos appear.  Speaking of Stephen, I recently queued his sweater pattern Reis after seeing Malia Mather’s finished version.  And even though it rarely gets cold enough in NorCal to wear mittens, I would really like to knit Tin Can Knits’ Grayling for myself.

In other news, sign ups for Tanis Fiber Arts’ 2015 Year in Color Club just opened.  I did that a few years ago and enjoyed it.  Also, Strickmich’s 2015 Club sign ups start the week of November 16.

That’s all for this week.  Happy Stitching!

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Economical good-times sweater project

Economical good-times sweater project

Every sock knitter knows what it’s like to have a lot of scrap sock yarn. I’ve never used an entire skein for a pair of socks. And since I knit a lot of socks, I have a lot of scrap sock yarn. Which feels a little wasteful when you see it sitting there in the yarn stash. There are a lot of stash-busting patterns available but I haven’t found any that I’m excited about.

I’ve decided to make an EPS sweater using nothing but my sock yarn leftovers. On size 4 needles, this is a very soothing stockinette experience. It’s fun to watch the colors come together, and to remember the original project with which I first used the yarn. Good times.